A Study on Vehicle Tire Inflation and Fuel Consumption

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A Study on Vehicle Tire Inflation and Fuel Consumption

Abstract: 

In recent years, there has been a steady rise in fuel consumed by vehicles in California (Stillwater Associates, 2020). Several factors contributing to this fuel demand can be attributed to an increase in vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in the State. Although an increase in VMT directly leads to an increase in fuel consumption (Lin and Prince, 2009), under-inflated tires can play a significant role in the operational performance and efficiency of a vehicle itself, thereby causing an increase in fuel consumption and demand (Grugett et al., 1981). This is corroborated by some recent studies that have established a direct relationship between tire pressures and a vehicle’s fuel consumption patterns (Thiriet et al., 2017; Sanchez et al., 2017). This research summarizes that relationship through a literature review. In this white paper, an empirical case study is also carried out to examine the impact of tire pressure on a vehicle’s fuel consumption. Data obtained from Booster Fuels have been used for this purpose.

 

Authors: 

SHAILESH CHANDRA, PhD

Dr. Chandra is an associate professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Construction Engineering Management at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). He has been a principal investigator (PI) for several projects funded by various transportation agencies including the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT).

VAHID BALALI, PhD

Dr. Balali, is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Construction Engineering Management at CSULB. Dr. Balali’s research focuses on visual data sensing and analytics, virtual design and construction for civil infrastructure and interoperable system integration, and smart cities in transportation for sustainable decision-making. 

Published: 
February 2021
Keywords: 
Fuel
Tire Pressure
Emissions
Rolling Friction
Collinearity

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MCTM
CSUTC
NTSC
NTFC

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