Cost-Benefit Analysis of Transit Access Modes: A Case Study in the San Francisco Bay Area

The goal of the proposed project is to capitalize on previous research on extending first and last mile access (via ridehailing, ridesharing, and microtransit with and without automated vehicles) with the San Francisco Bay Area Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s activity-based travel model, MTC-ABM, and the agent-based MATSim model (calibrated to the Bay Area) to conduct detailed consumer cost-benefit analyses at both the station and regional level and equity analyses with respect to income and household automobile availability. Uncertainties in estimates of consumer demand and costs and benefits will addressed by extensive sensitivity analyses.

It is well known that, on average, travelers will not walk more than a quarter mile to a transit station and that bus service to the nearest transit station is often too costly to provide and too slow to ride. The failure to optimally use transit undermines sustainable operating revenue and increases both congestion and greenhouse gas emissions. The proposed study leverages recent improvements to the mode choice model in Bay Area MATSim to simulate the modal demand for BART in the Bay Area with automated and non-automated ridehailing and ridesharing that provide door-to-door and common pick-up location services. The proposed study will use the results of the simulation to conduct detailed consumer cost-benefit analyses at both the station and regional level and equity analyses with respect to income and household automobile availability. for automated vehicles. Uncertainties in estimates of consumer demand and costs and benefits will be addressed by sensitivity analyses.

University: 

Mineta Consortium for Transportation Mobility
San José State University

Principal Investigator: 

Caroline Rodier, Ph.D.

PI Contact Information: 

Mineta Transportation Institute
San José State University
210 N. 4th St., 4th Floor
San Jose, CA 95112
cjrodier@ucdavis.edu 

Funding Source(s) and Amounts Provided (by each agency or organization): 

U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology – $70,000 

Total Project Cost: 

$70,000

Agency ID or Contract Number: 

69A3551747127

Dates: 

September 2018 to November 2019

Project Number: 

1816