PUBLICATION

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High-Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements of Success-Part 2

November 2006

Allison L. C. de Cerreño, Ph.D., Shishir Mathur, Ph.D

ABSTRACT

In August 2005, the Mineta Transportation Institute issued the report, High-Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements for Success. The report noted that since the 1960s, highspeed ground transportation (HSGT) has “held the promise of fast, convenient, and environmentally sound travel for distances between 40 and 600 miles.” After briefly discussing the different experiences with HSGT between the United States and its Asian and European counterparts, the report proceeded to review three U.S. cases—Florida, California, and the Pacific Northwest—as a means for identifying lessons learned for successfully implementing high-speed rail (HSR) in the United States.
This report is, in essence, volume 2 of the previous study. Also using a comparative case study approach, this effort adds to the earlier work with three additional cases—the Chicago Hub, the Keystone Corridor, and the Northeast Corridor (NEC). As with the earlier report, the goal of this study is to identify lessons learned for successfully implementing HSR in the United States. Given the early stages of most of these projects, “success” is defined by whether a given HSR project is still actively pursuing development or funding. However, in the case of the Northeast Corridor, a fuller discussion of success is provided since HSR has been implemented on that corridor for some time now.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

ALLISON L. C. DE CERREÑO, PH.D., Principal Investigator

2 Allison L. C. de Cerreño is Co-Director of the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, Assistant Research Professor, and Research Scientist at the New York University Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York. She also serves as Executive Director of the National Association of City Transportation Officials, Inc., (NACTO). Prior to joining the Rudin Center, Dr. C. de Cerreño was Director of Science & Technology Policy at the New York Academy of Sciences (1998–2002). Prior to that, she was Associate Director (1996–1998) of Studies and Research Associate for Latin America (1991–1996) at the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. C. de Cerreño taught courses in international relations at Hunter College (1991–1994) and at City College (1996).

She currently sits as Secretary of TRB’s Intercity Rail Passenger Systems Committee. Her transportation-related publications include: Pedestrian and Bicyclist Standards and Innovations in Large Central Cities (NYU Wagner Rudin Center, January 2006); High-Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements for Success (MTI, August 2005); Context Sensitive Solutions in Large Central Cities (FHWA, February 2004); Evaluation Study of the Port Authority of NY & NJ’s Value Pricing Initiative (RPI, January 2004); Funding Analysis for Long-Term Planning (NYU Wagner Rudin Center, July 2003); Dividing the Pie: Placing the Transportation Donor-Donee Debate in Perspective (NYU Wagner Rudin Center, May 2003); and The Dynamics of On-Street Parking in Large Cities (NYU Wagner Rudin Center, December 2002), a version of which was accepted in 2004 for publication in the Transportation Research Record by the Transportation Research Board. Other publications include: Pollution Prevention and Management Strategies for Mercury in the NY/NJ Harbor (New York Academy of Sciences-NYAS, May 2002); Maintaining Solid Foundations for Hi-Tech Growth: Transportation & Communications Infrastructure in the Tri-State Region (NYAS, 2001); University-Industry-Government Relations: Obstacles and Opportunities (NYAS, 1999); and Scientific Cooperation, State Conflict: The Roles of Scientists in Mitigating International Discord (NYAS, 1998).

TECHNICAL

MTI 06-03
High-Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements of Success-Part 2
Published: November 2006
Allison L. C. de Cerreño, Ph.D., Shishir Mathur, Ph.D

Keywords: Government funding; Line extensions; Rail transportation; Railroad construction; Railroad transportation; High-speed rail

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