“TELE-commuting” during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond: Unveiling statewide patterns and trends of telecommuting in relation to Transportation, Employment, Land use, and Emissions in California

This project seeks to: (1) identify statewide patterns and trends in telecommuting before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) understand the associations of telecommuting with the transportation system, employment and workforce characteristics, land use, and emissions. The project team will collect primary data based on state-level online surveys for employees and targeted interviews for employers, and analyze secondary data from national, state, and regional-level sources. The project will focus on using a crowd-sourced platform (i.e., Amazon Mechanical Turk) to obtain survey samples across California for employees and conduct interviews with stakeholders. Additionally, multiple regression models and predictive models will be developed.

Principal Investigator: 

Tianjun Lu

PI Contact Information: 

tilu@csudh.edu

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Dates: 

June 2021 to May 2022

Impacts/Benefits of Implementation: 

The approaches and results of this project will characterize telecommuting patterns and trends for the entire State of California by:

a. Understanding how the COVID-19 pandemic impacts telecommuting.

b. Quantifying the weaknesses and strengths of telecommuting on traffic congestion, travel behavior, and transportation infrastructure to facilitate sustainable transportation in California.

c. Identifying barriers of telecommuting in relation to job category, income, institutional organization, and incentives to develop modernized telecommuting policies to build equity.

d. Offering a thorough picture of telecommuting for both employers and employees to improve workplace flexibility in California.

e. Exploring the trade-offs of telecommuting on land use in the urban and rural areas across California.

f. Informing statewide and regional policymakers of plans and adaptation strategies to new patterns after the pandemic.

Project Number: 

2147