University Emergency Plan: Operations Section

This appendix includes the position descriptions and list of responsibilities for those individuals involved in the Operations Section of the campus’ emergency response team. See See Operations Section chart. Also included is a generic checklist for all positions within the Operations Section.

Included are descriptions for:

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The Operations Section of the Emergency Operations Center does the following:

Public Safety Branch

Coordinates overall public safety-related response with the field level Incident Commanders; ensures that university assets are effectively mobilized in support of the field response; that Community Fire Department assets are appropriately integrated into the response, and that Community Police Department mutual aid is activated directly, and other mutual aid resources are activated through the State’s regional EOC, when appropriate. Law enforcement mutual aid operates on a day-to-day basis as well as during emergencies.

Law Enforcement/Security Unit

Coordinates overall law enforcement/security in support of response to the emergency. This may involve traffic control, evacuation, evidence collection and protection, force protection, perimeter control, and access control. Coordinates with the County Medical Examiner/Coroner to ensure care for deceased victims.

Medical Examiner/Coroner Unit

Coordinates with the Law Enforcement/Security, Search and Rescue, and Medical Units to provide protection, identification and disposition of the fatalities, in concert with the County ME/Coroner.

Hazardous Materials Unit

Coordinates hazardous materials response. This may involve material identification, remedial actions, disposal, containment, personnel safety, and other response and recovery actions. Hazardous material mutual aid is coordinated through the Public Safety Branch for incident first response.

Search and Rescue Unit

Coordinates overall rescue activities. May include support to medical response, and coordinating fire-related activities with Community Fire Department.

Medical/Health Branch

Coordinates field-level medical response, participates in system for patient reception/hospital coordination, and patient support; coordinates mental health activities.

Public Health Unit

Ensures safety of food and water, provision of sanitation, and coordinates with Public Health officer to ensure that health concerns are addressed.

Mental Health Unit

Ensures provision of mental health care for campus victims and first responders; coordinates with County Mental Health for receipt or provision of mutual aid.

Care and Shelter Unit

Coordinates sheltering and feeding for displaced members of the campus residential community, and commuter students, faculty and staff who are unable to go home.

Construction and Engineering Branch

Coordinates the management and restoration/repair of the university’s infrastructure.

Transportation Infrastructure Unit

Ensures that transportation infrastructure on the campus is assessed for damage, and repaired/restored as rapidly as possible to support emergency response activities; coordinates with EOC Operations Chief to ensure that incident transportation access needs are met; coordinates with off-campus transportation assets, including city, county and State transportation departments, and transit agencies.

Utilities Unit

Coordinates mutual aid, repairs to systems and supplements electric systems by shifting loads on campus; coordinates with off-campus utility sources.

Communications Unit

Ensure that information from the computer aided dispatch (CAD) is available to EOC decision-makers; ensures the ability to communicate across the disaster area through Radio Amateurs in Civil Emergency Services (RACES), organized messengers and other non-electronic methods.

 

Operations Section chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Generic Checklist

(For All Positions)

Activation Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operations Section Chief

****Read This Entire Position Checklist Before Taking Action****

Responsibilities:

Ensure that the Operations function is carried out, including coordination of response with field forces for all operational functions assigned to the university EOC.

  1. Determine the status of field units, and provide support to the Incident Commander.
  2. Develop Operations Section objectives for the Action Planning Briefing, and ensure that Operations Section objectives and assignments identified in the EOC Action Plan are carried out effectively.
  3. Following the issuance of the Action Plan, brief all subordinates on the Plan, including the allocation of Operations Sections objectives to the various Branches and Units.
  4. Provide overall supervision of the Operations Section. Establish the appropriate level of branch and unit organizations within the Operations Section, continuously monitoring the effectiveness and modifying accordingly. Exercise overall responsibility for the coordination of Branch and Unit activities within the Operations Section.
  5. Ensure that the Planning/Intelligence Section is provided with Branch Status Reports and Major Incident Reports (utilizing the electronic management formats, if available).

Conduct periodic Operations briefings for the Management Section Chief as required or requested.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PUBLIC SAFETY BRANCH

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The role of the Public Safety Branch is to:

Mobilize and deploy public safety resources of the university, including the University Police/Security Department, hazardous materials specialists, and medical resources; and coordinate fire-related activities with community fire department for fire fighting resources and fire suppression and rescue operations.

  1. Coordinate fire safety measures appropriate to mitigation of fire hazards.
  2. Coordinate containment and cleanup of hazardous material releases.
  3. Assist in alerting and warning of the campus community, and surrounding neighborhoods when appropriate.
  4. Coordinate the Law Enforcement/Security personnel in perimeter and traffic control.
  5. Oversee Movement and Evacuation activities on campus, and coordinate with community EOC or police department regarding the impacts on city streets, especially those that might impact access to university facilities.
  6. Ensure the safety and security of all personnel and assets of the university.
  7. Direct search and rescue operations using university resources; coordinate with community fire department for additional assistance.
  8. Coordinate heavy rescue operations with campus resources, community fire department resources, private sector firms, State’s regional EOC, and State OES.
  9. Ensure that fire protection systems are in good working order in campus shelters.
  10. Advise decision makers of the risks associated with hazardous materials, as well as the circumstances for using water, foams, dispersants, or fog for extinguishing, diluting, or neutralizing hazardous materials, as needed.

Alert all emergency support services to the dangers associated with any hazardous materials and fire events on campus.

Units that may be activated are Law Enforcement/Security, Medical Examiner/Coroner, HazMat, and Search & Rescue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PUBLIC SAFETY BRANCH DIRECTOR

****Read This Entire Position Checklist Before Taking Action****

Responsibilities:

Ensure that field units employ the Incident Command System (ICS) in management of on-scene incidents. University Police/Security personnel will act as Incident Commander during any of the following events on campus property:

Fire Suppression
  1. Hazardous Material Incidents
  2. Evacuations
  3. Medical Emergencies
  4. Multiple Casual Incident Events. See Countywide Multiple Casual Incident Plan for details.
  5. Terrorist Attacks.
  6. Urban Search and Rescue Operations
  7. Heavy Rescue Operations
  8. Airplane Crashes on campus. The Police Department will act as lead agency until the arrival of Federal agencies. The initial focus will be fire suppression, multiple casualty management and hazardous material evaluations and response. [Note: Additional information to be developed]
  9. Radiological Incidents. The Police Department will act as lead agency until the arrival of State or federal agencies. Most likely, response actions will be limited to identification of the radioactive material involved, assisting Law Enforcement/Security in establishing perimeter control, and providing Radiological Monitoring personnel and equipment.
  10. Coordinate all Public Safety activities.
  11. Maintain communications with field units and ICS command posts.
  12. Evaluate status reports and prioritize the commitment of rescue resources, hazardous materials management resources, sheltering resources and medical care resources.
  13. Evaluate response capability and initiate requests for mutual aid.
  14. Coordinate acquisition and delivery to the site of necessary personal protective equipment, including respiratory devices, clothing, equipment, and antidotes for personnel to perform assigned tasks in hazardous radiological, biological, explosive or chemical environments.

Submit requests for mutual aid through established channels. Requests should include, at a minimum:

Reason for request
  1. Number and type of resources needed
  2. When needed
  3. Location where resources are to report
  4. To whom resources report

The State’s regional Fire and Rescue Coordinator, who serves on the staff of the State’s regional OES Manager during a STATE OF EMERGENCY or STATE OF WAR EMERGENCY, is responsible for coordination and dispatch of mutual aid resources within the region.

  1. Coordinate with community fire department in non-disaster search and rescue operations.
  2. Assist with evacuation and warning of the campus community. Normally, evacuations will be ordered by the University Police Chief (or by the community police chief if there is no University Police Department), except in hazardous material or radiological events, when it will be at the direction of the on-scene Incident Commander, or in biological/health events when it will be under the authority of the State Health Officer.
  3. Coordinate with the Logistics Section Facilities Unit to ensure that fire suppression systems are working in any campus mass care facilities.

When possible, supply incoming mutual aid forces with portable radios using local interoperable channels or other local frequencies; or ensure that their radio equipment is interoperable.

Activation Phase:

In the event of an EARTHQUAKE, arrange for relocation of University Police/Security equipment to open, safe areas.

Poll field units to ascertain:

In the event of a FLOOD/DAM FAILURE, determine the boundaries of present and anticipated inundation areas. Map these areas on EOC map.

In the event of a HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INCIDENT:

Make certain that the following reporting requirements are fulfilled. Coordinate with campus hazardous materials response resources and community Hazardous Incident Team to notify the following:

Determine the identity of the responsible party as soon as possible.

In the event of an EVACUATION:

In the event of a RADIOLOGICAL incident, request University Police/Security to implement perimeter control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LAW ENFORCEMENT/SECURITY UNIT

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The role of the Law Enforcement/Security Unit is to:

Mobilize, deploy, and organize University Police/ Security resources for traffic control, perimeter control operations and campus facility security.

  1. Support alerting and warning of the campus community.
  2. Assist Planning/Intelligence in completing their missions by reporting damage assessment information gathered by field units.
  3. Plan and supervise evacuation operations.
  4. Provide security in mass care facilities, multipurpose staging areas, casualty collection points, supply storage areas, critical facilities, and evacuated areas.

Oversee the protection of fatalities until such time as Medical Examiner/Coroner authorities are able to take over this responsibility; then provide security assistance as needed.

The Law Enforcement/Security Unit Leader will be provided by the University Police/Security Department. This position has the following responsibilities.

  • Coordinating Law Enforcement/Security Operations on campus.
  • Coordinating Law Enforcement/Security support to other campus response and recovery operations.
  • Evaluating status reports and prioritizing the commitment of Law Enforcement/Security resources.
  • Coordination of Law Enforcement mutual aid within the State structure.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

 

 

Law Enforcement/Security Unit Leader

**** Read This Entire Position Checklist Before Taking Action ****

Responsibilities:

Coordinate movement and evacuation operations during a disaster.

  1. Alert and notify the campus community and the surrounding neighborhoods of the impending or existing emergency on the campus.
  2. Coordinate Law Enforcement/Security and traffic control operations during the disaster.
  3. Coordinate site security at incidents.

Supervise the Law Enforcement/Security Unit.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

In the event of an EARTHQUAKE, initiate urban search and rescue operations using campus resources.

In the event of a FLOOD/DAM FAILURE, instruct field commanders to provide perimeter and traffic control in affected areas on campus.

In the event of a HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INCIDENT, implement perimeter and traffic control.

In the event of a RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT, provide perimeter/access/traffic control.

 

In the event of a NUCLEAR ATTACK, assist in alerting and warning the campus community.

In the event of an EVACUATION, assist in determining the need to evacuate affected or threatened areas.

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Examiner/Coroner Unit

OBJECTIVES

With respect to Medical Examiner/Coroner (ME/C) operations, the overall objectives of the University Police/Security Department during response and recovery operations associated with disasters are:

ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The County ME/C Office has statutory responsibility and authority for identifying dead persons and human tissue; determining and recording the cause, circumstances, and manner of death; and disposing of unclaimed and/or indigent deceased persons. In the absence of county authorities, within the property limits of the university, the Security/ Police Department will, to the extent possible, perform the tasks delineated in this section.

During disaster response and recovery operations, the County ME/C Office will bear responsibility for:

MUTUAL AID REGION

The State OES Region, Coroners Mutual Aid Coordinator (designated by the State Coroners Association) receives and responds to requests from County Coroners/Medical Examiners for mutual aid assistance from other jurisdictions and/or private sources. Should a present or anticipated emergency be of sufficient magnitude as to require the commitment of the resources of one or more counties, it is the responsibility of the Regional Coroners Mutual Aid Coordinator to organize and coordinate the dispatch of resources within the Region to the emergency area. The Regional Coroners Mutual Aid Coordinator shall advise appropriate officials at State OES of the situation. If the Region’s resources are overtaxed, the Regional Coroners Mutual Aid Coordinator will request assistance from the State level.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Level I Event: Emergency

If the ME/C’s office is equipped to handle the number of dead resulting from a disaster, the normal routine of examining, performing autopsies, fingerprinting, identifying, photographing and recording personal property of the deceased will usually be followed. If the number of fatalities overtaxes the ME/C’s office, then a temporary staging or collection area may be staffed by funeral directors in the area.

Level II Event: Community Disaster

The normal functioning of the ME/C's morgue is likely to be disrupted. To facilitate the process of carrying out normal procedures, the establishment of multiple staging areas or morgue sites may be necessary. ME/C staff, funeral directors, and volunteers may staff collection areas in districts. These personnel may handle the operation details of the ME/C's facility for their district. It will also be necessary to establish fatality collection areas for persons who die while in the hospital or en route to treatment areas. To avoid additional trauma to surviving victims, it will be important to establish the fatality collection areas away from hospitals or treatment facilities.

Level III Event: Regional Disaster

Due to the anticipated number of fatalities, identification of the deceased can be expected to pose a significant problem. This problem may not be immediately resolved; therefore, extended operation of storage facilities, or alternative burial may be necessary.

It is imperative that bodies and possessions be tagged and labeled as to location found, as well as recording other information that will enhance identification.

It is likely that some bodies will not be identifiable prior to burial. Therefore it is essential that accurate documentation of gravesites, case numbers, and burial orders be kept. Each body should be tagged with a metal or plastic tag containing identification information.

Fatality Collection Areas (FCAs)

Should fatalities exceed the response capability of the ME/C’s office, the ME/C's liaison will designate, organize, and arrange for the staffing of FCAs. The FCAs should be located as near as possible to the disaster site. The site selected for the FCA should have hot and cold running water, electricity, adequate parking, and communication links with the ME/C’s office and the ME/C’s liaison in the EOC. If possible the FCA should be located in an area away from public view, and should have facilities to safeguard property and effects of the deceased. Once the FCAs have been established, the ME/C's liaison may elect to secure refrigerated trucks, rail cars, or Conex boxes to assist in storage and transportation of remains.

 

 

Functions to be performed at the FCAs are:

Locating, Retrieving, and Tagging of Bodies

The removal and tagging of bodies is the legal responsibility of the ME/Coroner. Under ordinary circumstances the dead should be left exactly as they are found until an ME/Coroner deputy has conducted the required investigation. However, in a catastrophic disaster, expedient activities may be needed to protect the living from further trauma, permit the reuse of essential services facilities, or protect the dead from vectors, and stem the spread of disease. In that case, campus officials will have to determine that adequate ME/Coroner services are unavailable, and follow the ME/Coroner process.

The following policies and procedures will govern the recovery and identification process:

Expedient Burial

Expedient burial may become necessary when the number of victims becomes a public health hazard and the dead cannot be:

The decision to begin expedient burial must be made by the County Medical Examiner/Coroner and the County Health Officer, in conjunction with the State Department of Health Services.

Site selection will be governed by the nature, extent, and location of the disaster, as well as the number and location of the dead. Ideally, an existing cemetery would be the most logical location of an expedient burial site. If such a site is not available, consideration should be given to the following potential mass burial sites:

Prior to internment in an expedient burial site, bodies should be processed as follows:

Counseling Service

An information/locator service and counseling services should be set up by university staff, American Red Cross, County Mental Health workers, and the clergy, when possible. The county American Red Cross chapter has trained disaster inquiry workers who can assist with location of survivors, and connecting the ME/C office to the relatives who have called about the deceased.

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Examiner/Coroner Unit Leader

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Responsibilities:

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

HazMat Unit Leader

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Responsibilities:

Determine the scope of hazardous materials incidents throughout the campus.

  1. Assist in mobilizing hazardous materials teams at the request of the Incident Commanders.
  2. Request assistance from mutual aid systems as needed.
  3. Ensure that teams in the field are provided with adequate support.

Supervise the HazMat Unit.

Action Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

Search & Rescue Unit Leader

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Responsibilities:

Determine the scope of the search and rescue mission.

  1. Assist in mobilizing Search and Rescue Teams at the request of Operations Chief or Field Incident Commanders.

Supervise the Search & Rescue unit.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEDICAL/HEALTH BRANCH

OBJECTIVES

SUPPORTING ORGANIZATION

Multiple Casualty Incident Plan

The Multiple Casualty Incident Plan is developed and maintained by the County Emergency Medical Services Agency (EMS). EMS is responsible for:

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Overall management of countywide disaster medical operations is the responsibility of the County Health Department. Expedient medical care and first aid for casualties will be provided through a network of Casualty Collection Points (CCP) and first aid stations operated by the County Health Department and supported by local hospitals and health care professionals.

The University Health Center will, to the extent possible, accomplish the tasks delineated in this annex, in the absence of county resources and authorities.

In the event county medical resources are unable to meet the needs of disaster victims, University Health Center may request mutual aid from neighboring jurisdictions through the State’s regional EOC.

RECONNAISSANCE AND INFORMATION

The following information items are considered essential for effective management of disaster medical operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical/Health Branch Director

**** Read This Entire Position Checklist Before Taking Action ****

Responsibilities:

Ensure that all available university-based medical resources are identified and mobilized as required.

  1. Provide assistance to Incident Command Post in establishing triage teams.
  2. Contact County EMS to determine the status of medical facilities within the affected area.

Coordinate with the County EMS to ensure the transportation of injured victims to appropriate medical facilities as required.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT

PROCEDURES

Water Supply

Providing no restrictions have been placed on the water supply, it its estimated that a minimum of one gallon of water, per person, per day will be required. Possible sources of water are municipal systems, private systems of agriculture and industry, and springs and wells that have been certified as potable by the Public Health Officer. Should these systems be unable to meet the minimum demand for water, rationing may have to be initiated.

If potable water is not available, it may be necessary to treat and disinfect non-potable water.

Periodically, the Health Department will conduct tests of water supplies to determine potability.

Sanitary Waste Disposal

When the community sanitary sewer is not operational, alternative methods may be needed for human waste. Heavy duty plastic bags from existing stock, or obtained through the Procurement Branch, may be used to line existing toilets, and removed to secure storage when used several times. Contracts should be made in advance for the retrieval and proper disposal of the used bags. To accommodate the increased population in shelters, human waste disposal units may have to be constructed. Campus Facilities personnel will supervise and inspect the construction of these units. To the extent possible, privately owned chemical toilets will be obtained on contract including safe disposal of their contents. Special attention will be given to rapid provision of portable sanitation to parks and fields being used as shelters.

Solid Waste Disposal

It is anticipated that most solid waste will accrue at mass care facilities, with organic wastes being of particular concern to public health officials. Therefore, it is recommended that organic and inorganic waste should be collected and stored separately. Organic wastes will require heavier, washable, watertight containers, with tight fitting lids. When deciding on types of containers and methods of collection, the following should be considered:

 

 

 

The following types of disposal are recommended:

Sanitary landfill (Preferred option).

  1. Burial (Next best option). Non-organic waste may be stored in plastic bags for disposal later. Organic waste should be buried and covered with at least twelve inches of compacted soil.

Incineration. First aid stations will generate medical wastes, which should be incinerated on-site or buried temporarily for later legal disposal at a biological waste facility. Note: it may be necessary to use dry, non-garbage waste as a source of heat.

MASS FEEDING SERVICES

Some aspects of the food delivery system will need supervision to prevent the spread of disease and the spoilage or waste of food. Some of the most important are:

It is anticipated that mass-feeding facilities will be filled to capacity, and additional facilities may be required to serve the population in need. Maintaining cleanliness and sanitation standards will be of utmost importance. All sections should be kept clean and disinfected and only potable water should be used in the feeding centers. In addition to this, three separate basins (one for personal use, one for the cleansing of cooking utensils and dishes, and one for the washing of fruits and vegetables) should be set up. All sinks should be provided with detergents, access to boiling water, and organic waste containers where grease and food scraps can be deposited. Dishes should be immersed in boiling water for five minutes, if possible, or treated with a suitable germicidal chemical in the final rinse.

Food handlers must practice good personal hygiene and be free of boils, sores, and communicable diseases. To ensure compliance with this policy, medical examinations should be required of all food handlers. Prior to reporting to the mass feeding facility to begin work, the new food handlers should attend a brief training session that stresses personal hygiene and emphasizes hand washing and wearing of special garments for food service and preparation.

If refrigeration at the mass feeding facility is inadequate, perishables will have to be delivered daily. Raw vegetables and soft-skinned fruit should not be served at mass feeding facilities, unless their wholesomeness can be assured.

 

Public Health Unit Leader

****Read This Entire Position Checklist Before Taking Action****

Responsibilities:

Assess the status and availability of potable water for the campus.

  1. Assess the status of the sanitation system service for the campus.
  2. Coordinate with County Health Department to ensure that they are inspecting and assessing emergency supplies such as foodstuffs and other consumable for purity and utility.
  3. Assess the need for a vector control plan for the affected disaster area(s) within the campus.

Supervise the Public Health Unit.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mental Health Unit Leader

****Read This Entire Position Checklist Before Taking Action****

Responsibilities:

Ensure access to mental health care for all campus victims and first responders.

Supervise the Mental Health Unit.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

CARE AND SHELTER UNIT

OBJECTIVES

The overall objectives of care and shelter operations are:

PARTNERS

American Red Cross

The American Red Cross (ARC), as mandated by Federal Law 36-USC-3 and reaffirmed in Public Law 93-288, provides disaster relief in peacetime.

At the State level, the Statement of Operational Relationships between the ARC and the California Emergency Management Agency, and the Memorandum of Understanding between the ARC and the California Department of Social Services establishes the operating relationships among these agencies.

Emergency mass care includes providing:

The ARC acts cooperatively with State and local government and private sector relief organizations to provide emergency mass care to persons affected by disasters in peacetime. There is no legal mandate for American Red Cross involvement in a State of War Emergency. However, by decision of chapter Boards of Directors, the Red Cross Chapter Disaster Committees in California may, if incorporated into the civil defense plans of political subdivisions, serve as a component of civil defense to assist with emergency mass care operations.

County Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs)

The county may have an agency that serves as the focal point for the non-governmental organizations within the county that assist with emergency and disaster relief. Member agencies can assist campus organizations in the care and shelter function for campus community disaster victims, including special needs populations.

 

ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The Care and Shelter Unit Leader will:

Registration and Inquiry

During peacetime response and recovery operations, the ARC has the responsibility for conducting Registration and Inquiry operations. The ARC has trained Disaster Welfare Inquiry personnel, a system to recruit volunteer workers, and a tested program to handle mass inquiries. During most disasters, a Registration and Inquiry Center is established in the ARC Chapter office closest to the incident. On occasion, the ARC may designate a Headquarters for Disaster Operations. In the event fallout shelter operations are initiated, Registration and Information Coordinators in Reception and Care Centers have the responsibility for registration of shelter inhabitants.

Communications should be established between the Inquiry Center and shelters, hospitals, and coroners’ offices and morgues serving the university. Registration lists and location changes are sent to the Center daily, if practicable. If possible, inquiry and response information should be sent by email, teletypewriter exchange (TWX) or packet radio in order to provide a written record of the communications. Although every effort is made to locate all victims, it is probable that some campus community members will relocate without registering. In light of this, the Care and Shelter Unit Leader should request the PIO to issue bulletins requesting relocatees to notify relatives of their whereabouts, as well as register at an Inquiry Center.

Shelter Guidelines

Because of the variety of disasters that could occur at the university, it is impractical to list specific shelter sites that might be used to house and feed the community. A variety of factors will be considered in selecting site-specific shelters, such as proximity to the disaster site, without being within the disaster area; adequate transportation to the facility for those in the affected area; location in relation to a hazmat event (up-wind or cross-winds, uphill); location in relation to a flood event (high ground, stable soil).

Types of shelters are listed in priority order for use:

Small Scale/Limited Evacuation Event:

Public accommodations (hotels/motels)

  • Salvation Army facilities
  • Other existing temporary housing facilities
  • University-owned facilities, including parks and sports facilities

Large Scale/General Evacuation Event:

  • Nearest campus building neither in the disaster area, nor downwind of a hazmat event
  • Community shelters (obtain information from the County or State’s Regional EOC)
  • Public accommodations or Salvation Army facilities will be reserved for special needs groups

Lodging Operations

Feeding Operations

Mass feeding operations on campus will be the joint responsibility of Campus Catering and the American Red Cross, with the support of community NGOs where possible.

Fallout Shelter Operations

A list of public shelters, compiled from the National Facility Survey List, as well as the American Red Cross shelter listing, is kept on file in the County Office of Emergency Services. This list is updated as necessary, but not less than annually. In the event fallout shelter operations are implemented, available space (10 sq. ft. per person) will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Currently, a fallout shelter deficit exists in most counties. Therefore, it is anticipated that given adequate lead-time, construction of new fallout shelters, upgrading of existing shelters and homes, and use of expedient shelters will be necessary. At this time there may be no shelters in a community adequate to protect the population against blast or thermal radiation. Therefore, those citizens in assumed high risk areas with respect to the direct, prompt effects of a nuclear weapon detonation, will be notified of the potential danger by Emergency Alert System channels, and, based upon an informed decision, may elect to spontaneously evacuate the area, or remain in place, as the case may be.

Currently, designated fallout shelters are not stocked with food, water, and other essentials. In the event fallout shelter operations are implemented, city and county authorities will provide what food and water they can for shelterees. However, it is doubtful that governmental agencies will be able to provide sufficient provisions for the anticipated 14-day stay period in the fallout shelters. Therefore, shelterees will be instructed to bring water, nonperishable food items, blankets or sleeping bags, infant care items, medical needs, personal hygiene supplies and other essentials with them to the shelter.

During a crisis period, those designated shelters, which are unmarked, will be marked by public safety personnel.

Given adequate lead-time, the city Radiological Defense Officer will recruit and train additional radiological monitors and fallout shelter managers, sufficient to ensure that one each is available and assigned to a designated fallout shelter.

Communications between fallout shelters and the designated fallout shelter complex headquarters will be maintained by telephone where possible. However, it is likely that in the event of a nuclear attack, phone systems will be rendered inoperable. Therefore, communications will be maintained by whatever means necessary, with the preferred method being hand held radios, and RACES equipment and volunteers. Frequencies will be assigned by the county Emergency Services Coordinator.

Management of fallout shelters will be the joint responsibility of the Care and Shelter Unit Leader and a designated University Radiological Defense Officer.

Public fallout shelters will, to the extent possible, be kept free of contamination by requiring shelterees to decontaminate prior to entry, as well as monitoring of shelterees, particularly those that are entering for the first time, or reentering after exposure to the environment outside the shelter.

 

 

 

 

Care and Shelter Unit Leader

****Read This Entire Position Checklist Before Taking Action****

Responsibilities:

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

If Care and Shelter operations are initiated, or appear to be imminent, coordinate with the Public Safety Branch to determine, at a minimum:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSTRUCTION AND ENGINEERING BRANCH

OBJECTIVES

ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The University Construction and Engineering Branch Director is responsible for coordination and allocation of campus resources required for utility restoration, debris clearance, transportation infrastructure recovery, fallout shelter construction and upgrade, and campus search and rescue operations. Pre-disaster registration of campus experts, such as College of Engineering professors and students, Applied Arts and Sciences professors and students, and others with needed skills, can provide a list to augment staff resources.

Additional support may be obtained from the following:

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Post-Event Inspection of Facilities and Structures

Inspections to determine serviceability will be conducted in accordance with the Damage Assessment Plan for Volunteer Engineers, and the Damage Assessment Plan for Building Officials (published and issued by State EMA).

Debris Clearance

Eligibility criteria and administrative procedures relative to the application for federal grants to assist in defraying costs incurred in performing emergency debris clearance are outlined in State and Federal disaster planning documents. Finance/Administration Section will complete and coordinate such applications with the County OES.

Transportation Infrastructure Recovery

Construction and Engineering Branch and Public Safety Branch staff will survey damage to transportation infrastructure and report their findings to the Operations Section Chief.

Priority will be given to:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction/Engineering Branch Director

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Responsibilities:

Survey all utility systems, and restore systems that have been disrupted, including coordinating with utility service providers in the restoration of disrupted services.

  1. Coordinate the repair of damage to campus facilities.
  2. Survey all other campus infrastructure systems, and coordinate their restoration.
  3. Assist other sections, branches, and units as needed.

Supervise the Construction/Engineering Branch.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Utilities Unit Leader

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Responsibilities:

Assess the status of utilities; provide Utility Status Reports as required.

  1. Coordinate restoration of damaged utilities with utility companies.

Supervise the Utilities Unit.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation Infrastructure Unit Leader

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Responsibilities:

Assess the status of all streets, roadways, sidewalks, bicycle paths, garages and parking lots (transportation infrastructure) on the campus.

  1. Coordinate with local and State transportation agencies to determine the status of streets, highways and bridges that relate to access to the campus, including the interstate highway system.
  2. Coordinate with local and State transportation agencies to determine available evacuation routes, travel routes from the campus to hospitals, and possible traffic control available to speed access on these routes, such as one-way, contra-flow, signal control.
  3. Develop a Transportation Corridor Plan that identifies routes of ingress and egress, and staging areas to facilitate the movement of response personnel, the affected population, and shipment of resources and materials. Distribute this plan to the Operations Chief, the Planning/Intelligence Situation Status Branch, and the Transportation/Fleet Branch.
  4. When requested, identify and prepare heli-spots.
  5. Coordinate information on restoration of damaged transportation assets with the agency that owns the asset.

Supervise the Transportation Infrastructure Unit.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Road Debris Removal Group

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Responsibilities:

Understand the capability for removing debris from the road using university resources.

  1. Coordinate with Logistics Section Procurement Branch to maintain a list of other sources of road debris removal resources.

Oversee road debris removal operations.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traffic Management Group

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Responsibilities:

Maintain an inventory of all university-owned traffic management equipment.

  1. Coordinate with Logistics Section Procurement Branch to maintain a list of alternative sources of traffic management equipment, with 24-hour contact information for each.

Oversee traffic management operations.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Road Repair group

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Responsibilities:

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bridge and Levee Surveillance Group

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Responsibilities:

Monitor the condition of bridges and levees, and conduct damage assessment.

Monitor the water levels at bridges and levees.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communication Unit Leader

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Responsibilities:

Create the master EOC log. Log significant events from the computer aided dispatch system (CAD).

  1. Access CAD information regarding calls for service. Print out the CAD for the Action period; highlight the calls that are related to the disaster with blue highlighter, and Code 3 calls unrelated to the disaster in yellow. Analyze the calls for services and provide the Operations Chief with an analysis to present as part of his Action Planning report.
  2. Assist the Operations Chief and Branch Directors with accessing information on the deployment of field forces in support of the disaster.

Assist in the creation and distribution of the Incident Action Plan in coordination with the Planning/Intelligence Section Chief. Provide Situation Status data from the EOC Log.

Activation Phase:

Operational Phase:

Demobilization Phase: